Giuseppe Dezza

Greatest depth 37m
Smallest depth 32m
Length 40m (prow), 25m (stern)
Width 7,5m

Built in 1913, this Italian minesweeper sunk in 1944. Until 1929, it carried the name “Pilade Bronzetti”. It was sunk by English aircraft that spotted it during a routine reconnaissance flight. A torpedo tore the vessel in two, so the prow and the stern are now located at a distance of about 50 m. The stern has a greater appeal to divers. The Giuseppe Dezza lies on the seabed in an upright position as if frozen in time, and the cannons and military equipment on its stern are well visible.


Baron Gautsch

Greatest depth 39m
Smallest depth 28m
Length 89m
Width 11,5m

Built in 1908., this Austrian passenger ship sank after hitting a mine in 1914. It was carrying the families of Austrian officers on the Boka Kotorska-Mali Lošinj-Trieste route. Wanting to shorten the voyage, the ship attempted to pass through a minefield, 9 nautical miles off Rovinj. The Baron Gautsch touched a mine amid ship portside, and the ship quickly sank. Remorker- Greatest depth 37m, smallest depth 35m, length 15m, width 3,5m. This tugboat that sank in the 1960s was used for maneuvering larger ships in the harbor. Because of its fairly small size, it is not possible to dive inside the wreck but only around it. The greatest attraction at this dive site is the many fish that inhabit the wreck.


Remorker

Greatest depth 42m
Smallest depth 33m
Length 60m
Width 9m

This tugboat that sank in the 1960s was used for manoeuvring larger ships in the harbour. Because of its fairly small size, it is not possible to dive inside the wreck but only around it. The greatest attraction at this dive site is the many fish that inhabit the wreck. Although small, its abundance of fish makes it a very interesting site for divers who have just mastered the techniques of wreck diving or deep diving.


Hans Schmidt

Greatest depth 43m
Smallest depth 35m
Length 99m
Width 11,5m

For a long time, this wreck was known as the Istria, because its true name was not known. It was built in 1920 in the Netherlands (under the name of the Albireo), but it carries the name of its last owner from Germany. This cargo steamship was ripped in two by an explosion when it struck an underwater anti-watercraft mine on 23 January 1943. On its fatal voyage, it was transporting armament and ammunition. Particularly interesting and of historical interest is the special type of anchor that has not been in production for more than 100 years.


John Gilmoure

Greatest depth 44m
Smallest depth 36m
Length 50m
Width 8m

A merchant steamship, whose true name is not known, it changed owners and flags several times during its history, so we cannot say with certainty what was the last name that it carried. It is considered to be one of the first ships to sink in the waters of Istria at the beginning of World War I. The information available tells us that it was built in an English shipyard and equipped with John Gilmore engines that gave it the name it has today. It is possible to dive inside the wreck, which is well preserved.


Flamingo

Greatest depth 45m
Smallest depth 42m
Length 22m
Width 4,8m

Shortly before it sank, the Italian ship was armed with two torpedoes on its fore end. Built as early as 1889, it sank in 1914 after hitting one of its own mines. Captain J.O. Krieg managed to send up a distress flare and launch a lifeboat. Due to strong winds and high waves, the lifeboat was soon destroyed, leaving the crew to struggle against the sea and the storm. Today the Flamingo resides in the silence of the sea depths, and its loyal visitors, apart from divers, are a multitude of fish and crabs.


Varese

Greatest depth 42m
Smallest depth 33m
Length 60m
Width 9m

The Italian merchant steamship Varese sank in 1915 while transporting cargo from Trieste to Tunisia. Because of stormy weather in the northern Adriatic, the captain decided to seek refuge in the port of Pula. Sailing towards the harbor, the ship struck a mine that destroyed the prow, causing the ship to sink to the spot it is located today. It is possible to dive inside the wreck, which is quite wide and safe in its entire length.


Submarine 82

Greatest depth 38m
Smallest depth 35m
length 26m
width 4m

This Germany submarine was sunk towards the end of World War I in the open sea near the Stoja swimming beach in Pula. It was one of the seven submarines that the Germans themselves sank immediately before the war ended. The submarine is not whole; only its stern, which is open, has been found. Still visible on the submarine are the remains of military equipment and air holes. Because of the vicinity of the beach, diving is also possible in unfavorable weather conditions.


Draga

Greatest depth 37m
Smallest depth 34m
Length 25m
Width 6m

The Draga was a sand-dredging boat. It sank in the 1960s due to poor weather and overloading that caused a breach in the prow, after which the vessel began to take in water. This wreck is exceptionally rich in fish. Its permanent inhabitants mostly include eels, scorpion fish, lobsters, crabs and sea catfish. You can also find a variety of marine flora and fauna around the wreck.


VIS

Greatest depth 32m
Smallest depth 18m
Length 58m
Width 9m

VIS- Yugoslavian navy ship, built 1953. in Pula’s shipyard Uljanik, Greatest depth 32 m, Smallest depth 18 m lenght= 58m, width=9m and weighs 660 tons. Was sunk on purpose in May 2016., the ship has two machines of a thousand horse powers.

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